Posts Tagged ‘40 meter cw’

Pastime Projects rights to copy

July 10, 2018

The Pastime Projects (www.pastimeprojects.com) web site contains warnings about copyright
terms and conditions. This may frighten away those experimenters who are inspired by the
vintage makeup of our kits. That is the last thing we want to do! Please email us at
pastimeprojects(at)yahoo(dot)com for permission to copy or request copies of our materials.
We are “Makers” “do it yourselfers” handy men, or what ever you call yourself!
Let us hear from you! How can we help you?

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Pastime Projects High Voltage Power Supplies

September 3, 2015

Pastime Projects (www.pastimeprojects.com) manufactures amateur radio kits. Two of our most favorite are the “Remember When” slat board 6V6 kit which was featured in the 1948 (and elsewhere) ARRL Amateur Radio Handbook. This simple transmitter used a 6V6 (or 6L6) vacuum tube on a chassis made of orange crate wood. It was designed for the amateur radio operator to send CW (code) on 80 or 40 meters.
Our more recent kit uses a metal chassis and an improved oscillator kit introduced in the 1960’s Handbooks. It was more stable, easier on crystals, and oscillated on 80, 40 and other bands by switching plug-in coils. Ours uses a 50 ohm link coupled output which matches today’s antennas, antenna tuners, low pass filters, and dummy loads.
These circuits, as first published, were often accompanied by a power supply design which used a 5 volt rectifier vacuum tube. We chose to use modern solid state silicon rectifiers instead. This eliminated the need for a 5 volt winding on the transformer, and the added heat, light, current demand, vacuum tube, tube socket and so
on associated with the rectifier tube.
The result is a simpler less costly power supply for you to build and enjoy. Best regards, Glenn Brown W8JZI for pastimeprojects.com

Pastime Projects Aluminum Chassis 6V6 6L6 CW Transmitter Kit Now Shipping

April 25, 2015

APRIL 24, 2015   The new aluminum chassis transmitter kit manufactured by Pastime Projects (www.pastimeprojects.com) is now shipping. This kit features a pre-punched aluminum chassis, a 15 page manual, tube sockets, variable capacitor, key jack, SO 239 chassis mount antenna connector, expanded metal bottom cover, chokes, capacitors, resistors, power and hookup wires, coil form with instructions, new tested 6V6/6L6 vacuum tube, power wire cable sleeving,  and hardware. The design is based on handbook designs of the 1960’s and allows band changing with coils and crystals. It has been tested on 160 and 80 meters and suitable coils will be released in the near future.

The 6V6 MC Model kit can be purchased from www.pastimeprojects.com.  See the web page for further details.

Pastime Projects 6V6 Transmitter Kit Features

April 1, 2015

The new 6V6 MC Transmitter being introduced by Pastime Projects is a single tube CW (code) transmitter for use in the HF Amateur Radio Bands. The initial offering will be for 40 Meter Band operation. It is a vacuum tube kit which the buyer assembles. A complete manual is provided for those with technical ability and experience to assemble and operate. The design is based on circuits commonly used in the 1960 era of amateur radio. Some features of this project are described on the home page of the Pastime Projects Home Page found at http://www.pastimeprojects.com.

If you are interested in purchasing one of these kit when they are released, you can get on the first come, first served list by contacting pastimeprojects(at)yahoo(dot)com.  73 Glenn for Pastime Projects

Pastime Projects Vintage style 6V6 Tube Type CW Transmitter – Another reveiw.

February 8, 2014

We would like to thank Amateur Radio Operator WB0FDJ Clarence for his writeup in eHamNet of our slat board
vintage style 6V6 CW 80/40 meter CW kit. See http://www.eham.net/reviews/detail/10299. It is reviews like
this that bring others to our web page http://www.pastimeprojects.com . Thanks Clarence and happy operating!
Glenn pastimeproject(at)yahoo.com

Prototype Pastime Projects Metal Chassis 6V6/6L6 transmitter on sale.

June 30, 2013

Assembled and Tested!

Assembled and Tested!


The new Pastime Projects 6V6 transmitter kit has been built and tested as a prototype. The difference between the prototype and the production models is the chassis. The metal chassis on the prototypes was machined by hand. The production chassis are cut in a high pressure water jet precision tooling machine. The prototypes were assembled and tested here and look and work great! Allow us a little time to get these out the door to you. There was a total of
7 or 8, and when they ship we will start packing the production kits with parts, manuals, and instruction manuals. This design is based on conventional handbook
designs of the late 1950’s and 1960’s. Operating on 40 meters. 3 to 10 watts of cw output into 50 ohms..
COME AND GET’EM Glenn for Pastime Projects
http://www.pastimeprojects.com

Use of light bulb dummy loads in Vintage Amateur Radios

May 29, 2013

We recently reworked a Johnson Viking Adventurer CW transmitter and an EICO 723 transmitter, both manufactured in the 1960’s. They can be seen at http://www.pastimeprojects.com on the Special Sales page.
A common failure of these transmitters was the power transformers.
They can overheat from current draw in excess of specified limits. This is often caused by not tuning the transmitter quickly or by mistuning and operating out of resonance.
Back in the 1950 and 1960’s we often used an incandescent light bulb for a load. It was cheap, and the resistance was close to 50 ohms or so required for the output of the transmitter. Tube type transmitters are a lot more forgiving from misstuning than solid state types. Never use a light bulb for a dummy load on your new
solid state rig! Choose a light bulb that has a wattage higher than the expected output of your transmitter. Watching the light bulb as you quickly tune to resonance will get you properly tuned without
too much time passing. Brightness is an indicator of power out. After tuning make sure you are not exceeding the recommended current draw. If you are, decrease the antenna coupling until you
are lower than maximum recommended power. Remember the old transmitter were rated in power input, now output. Output will always be lower. Input is plate current times plate voltage. This discussion is very simplified. Stay away from high voltage and high r.f wires. It’s hoped that it will help you see how to tune your boatanchor radio. Look for more detail in our newsletters and we may put out a video on disc or YouTube.
Questions are always welcome. Glenn for Pastime Projects.
pastimeprojects(at)yahoo(dot)com..

QRP HISTORY IN THE MAKING?

June 15, 2012

Just received an email from a ham in South Carolina that used our  Pastime Projects “Look Ma” 12K5 tube 40 meter cw oscillator kit to make contact with a fellow QRP enthusiast in Pennsylvania using his mini milliwatt kit on the 40 meter band.  Here are some excerpts from his email “This is the second qrp rig that I have built, and I have to say, it is quickly becoming my favorite” …” It is a simple kit to build” … “The only thing I did not like was the crystal did not fit into the beautiful ceramic crystal socket that was included in the kit”. “I would recommend this to anyone who loves to build and maybe learn something new”…”I really hope you guys continue to sell this rig…”

You will hear more from this Ham Operator.  Sure got us excited.  Very best regards  Glenn  www.pastimeprojects.comPastime Projects 12K5 Tube Type 40 Meter QRP Qscillator Kit